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06-04-2017 | Osteoarthritis | Review | Article

The role of metabolism in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis

Authors:
Ali Mobasheri, Margaret P. Rayman, Oreste Gualillo, Jérémie Sellam, Peter van der Kraan, Ursula Fearon

Abstract

Metabolism is important for cartilage and synovial joint function. Under adverse microenvironmental conditions, mammalian cells undergo a switch in cell metabolism from a resting regulatory state to a highly metabolically activate state to maintain energy homeostasis. This phenomenon also leads to an increase in metabolic intermediates for the biosynthesis of inflammatory and degradative proteins, which in turn activate key transcription factors and inflammatory signalling pathways involved in catabolic processes, and the persistent perpetuation of drivers of pathogenesis. In the past few years, several studies have demonstrated that metabolism has a key role in inflammatory joint diseases. In particular, metabolism is drastically altered in osteoarthritis (OA) and aberrant immunometabolism may be a key feature of many phenotypes of OA. This Review focuses on aberrant metabolism in the pathogenesis of OA, summarizing the current state of knowledge on the role of impaired metabolism in the cells of the osteoarthritic joint. We also highlight areas for future research, such as the potential to target metabolic pathways and mediators therapeutically.

Nat Rev Rheumatol 2017;13:302–311. doi:10.1038/nrrheum.2017.50

 

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