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28-11-2017 | Psoriatic arthritis | Article

Addressing comorbidities in psoriatic disease

Journal:
Rheumatology International

Authors: Priya Patel, Cheryl F. Rosen, Vinod Chandran, Yang Justine Ye, Dafna D. Gladman

Publisher: Springer Berlin Heidelberg

Abstract

Psoriasis and PsA are associated with comorbidities including cardiovascular disease, obesity, metabolic syndrome and depression. The purpose of this study was to examine if patients recognize that they are being monitored for comorbidities associated with their condition, and to determine which physicians are managing these comorbidities. Patients with psoriasis without arthritis (PsC) and patients with PsA were recruited from the University of Toronto Psoriasis Cohort and Psoriatic Arthritis Clinic, respectively. A comorbidity questionnaire was developed through a literature review and patients completed the questionnaire at clinic visits or over the telephone. PsA patient responses were compared with information recorded by physicians at clinic visits. A total of 268 patients (103 PsC and 164 PsA) were included. Patients indicated having their blood pressure (96.3%), weight (94.4%), blood sugar (75%) and cholesterol (79.5%) levels checked, with PsA patients indicating being checked more frequently than PsC patients. PsA patients were most uncertain about whether their blood sugar and cholesterol levels were checked by physicians. The highest correlation between patient responses and physician records occurred for medications for diabetes, depression and hypercholesterolemia. Patients indicated their family physician were most responsible in monitoring the comorbidities. Overall, patients documented being moderately well screened for most comorbidities and were most unsure about having their blood sugar and cholesterol levels monitored. Patient education and records should be improved at clinic visits, as there are discrepancies between patient responses and physician records regarding the presence and treatment of comorbidities.

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