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09-10-2017 | Rheumatoid arthritis | Article

Discordance of the Framingham cardiovascular risk score and the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association risk score in systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis

Journal:
Clinical Rheumatology

Authors: Kashif Jafri, Alexis Ogdie, Atif Qasim, Sarah L. Patterson, Milena Gianfrancesco, Zara Izadi, Patricia Katz, Jinoos Yazdany, Gabriela Schmajuk

Publisher: Springer London

Abstract

Despite the increasing use of the 2013 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) cardiovascular (CV) risk score in clinical practice, few studies have compared this score to the Framingham risk score among rheumatologic patients. We calculated Framingham and 2013 ACC/AHA risk scores in subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and assessed demographic, CV, and rheumatologic characteristics associated with discordant scores (high-risk ACC/AHA scores but low-risk Framingham scores). SLE and RA subjects drawn from two population-based cohort studies were assessed during in-person study visits. We used chi-squared tests and t tests to examine the association of discordant CV risk scores with baseline characteristics. Eleven (7.0%) of 157 SLE subjects and 11 (11.5%) of 96 RA subjects had discordant CV risk scores with high ACC/AHA scores and low Framingham scores. These findings did not significantly change when a 1.5 multiplier was applied to the Framingham score. Rheumatologic disease duration, high-sensitivity CRP levels, African-American race, diabetes, current use of anti-hypertensive medication, higher age, and higher systolic blood pressure were each significantly associated with discordant risk scores. Approximately 10% of SLE and RA subjects had discordant 10-year CV risk scores. Our findings suggest that the use of the 2013 ACC/AHA risk score could result in changes to lipid-lowering therapy recommendations in a significant number of rheumatologic patients. Prospective studies are needed to compare which score better predicts CV events in rheumatologic patients, especially those with risk factors associated with discordant risk scores.

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